Health & Beauty

All About Health and Beauty in the Middle East, Africa and the World.

appiest nations but there is no place in the top ten for Britain or America

  • The World Happiness Report, released today, ranked 156 countries by happiness
  • Finland has topped the list while the top ten included four more Nordic countries
  • There was no place in the top ten for Britain or the US, which was 18th in the list 

Finland has been named the happiest country in the world, leading a top ten that includes a tot Nordic nations.

The World Happiness Report, released today, ranked 156 countries by happiness levels, based on factors such as life expectancy, social support and corruption.

But while the Nordic countries of Finland, Norway, Denmark and Iceland topped the list, there was no place in the top ten for Britain, which was named 19th – one place above the United Arab Emirates.

The East African nation of Burundi was at the bottom of the happiness index which found America, at 18th, was getting less happy even as their country became richer.

Fans of skiing, saunas and Father Christmas won't be surprised to hear Finland has been named the happiest place to live. Its capital Helsinki is shown in this file picture

Fans of skiing, saunas and Father Christmas won’t be surprised to hear Finland has been named the happiest place to live. Its capital Helsinki is shown in this file picture

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Findings shed light on variations in response to treatment between diabetics –and could help identify those at high risk of complications

Tailored treatment of the disease could be possible in the future, say scientists.
Tailored treatment of the disease could be possible in the future, say scientists. Photograph: Peter Byrne/PA

Diabetes that begins in adulthood falls into five distinct categories, new research has revealed, with scientists suggesting it is time to ditch the idea that diabetes is largely split into two types.

Researchers say all of the newly classified subgroups are genetically distinct and have numerous differences, including the age at which they tend to occur and different levels of risk for complications such as kidney disease.

The team say the findings shed light on why some diabetics respond very differently to treatment than others, adding that it could help identify those who might be at high risk of complications, and lead to tailored treatment of the disease.

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